APRN Independence and Prescriptive Power Paper

APRN Independence and Prescriptive Power Paper

APRN Independence and Prescriptive Power Paper

In nursing, a person’s scope of practice is determined by their level of education and training. For instance, an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) completes a postgraduate nursing program and is required to perform more sophisticated and difficult nursing duties. As part of their practice, APRNs are tasked with prescription privileges. Concerning prescriptive authority, there are significant differences among the states. In my state, Washington, APRNs have the authority to prescribe without restriction; over-the-counter medicines, devices, additional medical services, durable medical equipment, and other supplies (APRN prescribing law: A state-by-state summary, 2018).

APRN Independence and Prescriptive Power Paper

Since a 2005 law eliminated the need for a collaborative practice agreement with a doctor to prescribe schedule II-IV medicines (CS), Washington State’s APRNs have full autonomy in prescribing (CS). This initiative was steered by Susan Caverly and Claire Foote and advocated by Washington State Nurses Association (WSNA) in January of 1989. It was completed after 16 years on April 13, 2005, when House Bill 1479 (Political history: 1986-present, 2019), “Relating to Independent Prescriptive Authority for Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners,” was approved by Governor Christine Gregoire.

The restricted scope of practice of APRNs within rural communities leads to reduced service provider supply, healthcare access and utilization, and quality of care (Ortiz et al., 2018). As a result, rural communities are predisposed to significant morbidity and mortality. Many people regard advocacy as an ethical principle of nursing practice and the essence of the nursing profession. Therefore, I would draw the human and technological resources to impact the APRNs scope of practice. It is achieved through utilizing formulary protocols and prescriptions and promoting continuous medical education to health care providers.

APRNs have received advanced training in several clinical specialties, enabling them to assess, diagnose, and treat patients accurately. For this reason, they should be endowed with the full capacity to practice autonomously. Moreover, they should be granted the power to prescribe and manage patients from rural communities. Full practice with the relaxation of the scope of restrictions improves access to care and reduces morbidity and mortality. Therefore, a future nursing campaign, new policy formulation, and mobilization of resources are key to enhancing full practice authority by APRNs.

References for APRN Independence and Prescriptive Power Paper