National Patient Safety Goal 1 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Paper

National Patient Safety Goal 1 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Paper

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a medical condition that results from inadequate insulin secretion, resistance to insulin action, increased glucagon activity, or a combination of the stated factors. Type 2 diabetes mellitus presents as episodes of extreme hyperglycemia with a classic manifestation of polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia, and weight loss (Chatterjee, Khunti & Davies, 2017). Though type 2 diabetes mellitus is commonly associated with older patients, it can occur in younger age groups. There is no curative therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Its management mainly aims to reduce episodes of extreme hyperglycemia, control the progression of the disease, and develop associated medical complications. Thus, as Chawla et al. (2020) notes, regularly educating people with diabetes on how to use their medications and the importance of adhering to the medication is a vital component of diabetes management.

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The establishment of weekly wellness programs for school-aged children with type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the proposed solutions as a holistic approach to improving the management of the disease among this age group. This aspect is consistent with the current evidence of patient-centered quality care.  Involvement of the children in the management of their condition through educating them on the condition and how it is managed improves the compliance to medication and ultimately less diabetes-related medical complications (Absil et al., 2019). Conducting weekly wellness programs for school-aged children with diabetes type 2 is a realistic intervention since it can be done within a short time or even integrated as part of their routine clinical check-ups.

The proposed establishment of weekly wellness programs for school-aged children with type 2 diabetes is in line with the organization’s culture and resources. The program requires minimal resources to be executed. The human resource required is one medical personnel for every session or integration of the program into routine weekly clinical check-ups. The medical officer educates the patients on their conditions and their management. The expected outcome of this program is to boost adherence to medication among school-aged children with diabetes type 2. Secondly, the intervention seeks to reduce the incidences of acute hyperglycemic episodes that require medical admissions, to slow early disease progression among adolescents, and to prevent the early development of debilitating diabetes-related complications like nephropathy, and peripheral neuropathy (Faselis et al., 2020).

The outcomes of the program will be achieved through educating the school-aged children with diabetes type 2 on:

  • Pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Clinical manifestations of type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Signs and symptoms of an acute hyperglycemic episode
  • Treatment options of type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Recommended lifestyle modifications for persons living with type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Possible long-term complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus

The possible barrier to this program is the complexity and heavy medical terminologies involved in educating people on diabetes. The medical terms could be too complex for the children to comprehend. This could be mitigated by using diagrammatic illustrations to propel the children’s understanding and easy comprehension.

The program outcomes are expected to positively impact the quality of care given to school-aged children with type 2 diabetes, enhance patient-centered quality care, and increase the efficiency of processes within the hospital setup. The quality of care given will improve since the children will be compliant with their medication and will be capable of integrating physical activity into daily activities, thus reducing the progression of the disease to acute forms (Pulungan, Afifa & Annisa, 2018). Educating the children on their ailment will boost patient-centered care. They will understand the importance of routine procedures and check-ups on them and can be a party to decision-making regarding treatment.

Educating school-aged children with type 2 diabetes is an important aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. Thus, weekly wellness programs should be integrated into disease management among school-aged children with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

References for National Patient Safety Goal 1 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Paper

Chatterjee, S., Khunti, K., & Davies, M. J. (2017). Type 2 diabetes. The lancet389(10085), 2239-2251. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(17)30058-2

Chawla, R., Madhu, S. V., Makkar, B. M., Ghosh, S., Saboo, B., & Kalra, S. (2020). RSSDI-ESI clinical practice recommendations for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus 2020. International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries40(1), 1-122. https://dx.doi.org/10.4103%2Fijem.IJEM_225_20

Faselis, C., Katsimardou, A., Imprialos, K., Deligkaris, P., Kallistratos, M., & Dimitriadis, K. (2020). Microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Current Vascular Pharmacology18(2), 117-124. https://doi.org/10.2174/1570161117666190502103733

Absil, H., Baudet, L., Robert, A., & Lysy, P. A. (2019). Benefits of physical activity in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A systematic review. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 156(), 107810–. doi:10.1016/j.diabres.2019.107810

Pulungan, A. B., Afifa, I. T., & Annisa, D. (2018). Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents: an Indonesian perspective. Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism23(3), 119. http://www.e-apem.org/