NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Lifestyle factors are important in disease etiology. Changes in lifestyle behaviors have recently been blamed for an increase in cardiovascular disease cases. Unhealthy eating habits, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity are all examples of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Roth et al. (2020 NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan) believe that combining lifestyle changes with pharmacological therapies for various diseases yields the best results. Stroke is an example of a cardiovascular-related event characterized by a high-risk lifestyle. Here below, find a discussion about the health concern of stroke, best practices for health improvement, management and prevention goals, and community resources for a safe and effective continuum of care.

NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Analysis of Stroke, Best Practices for Improvement

Over the years, the definition of a stroke has evolved. Many scholars now define it as a rapidly developing episode of focal or, at times, global loss of cerebral function that lasts more than 24 hours (Roth et al., 2020). According to the World Health Organization, the global burden of stroke is estimated to be 15 million cases per year, with an estimated 5.8 million deaths per year (Tarvonen-Schröder et al., 2019). The majority of cases, roughly two-thirds, occur in developing countries, with a decreasing incidence reported in developed countries. The literature has extensively discussed two types of stroke: ischemic, which is the most common, and hemorrhagic. The pathophysiologic processes are based on a clot that causes Vaso occlusion in ischemic stroke and, hemorrhage into the cerebral tissue in hemorrhagic stroke (Tarvonen-Schröder et al., 2019 NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan). There are numerous risk factors for stroke, which can be classified as non-modifiable (such as advanced age, Black race, male sex, and previous history of stroke) or modifiable (such as hypertension, Diabetes Mellitus, cardiac diseases, tobacco use, alcohol use, HIV, and oral contraceptives (Tarvonen-Schröder et al., 2019). Among the factors listed, hypertension and diabetes are the most common modifiable risk factors, affecting 80% and 34% of stroke patients, respectively.

Physical, psychosocial, and cultural strategies can be used to improve health and prevent the occurrence, treatment, or recurrence of stroke. Physical primary prevention strategies include screening for and treating risk conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and obesity, as well as reducing behavioral risk factors such as quitting smoking and limiting or stopping alcohol consumption (Tarvonen-Schröder et al., 2019 NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan). Secondary strategies aim to reduce the risk of disability by preventing recurrent strokes, preventing brain tissue damage, and reducing disability risk. One of the strategies is to use an antiaggregant such as aspirin. Blood pressure control, behavioral risk reduction (smoking cessation and alcohol consumption limitation), a healthy diet, and physical activity are all recommended (Tarvonen-Schröder et al., 2019). Stroke may have neuropsychiatric consequences because of (1) direct damage to cerebral tissues and (2) the stigma and debilitation that accompany stroke (Nemani & Gurin, 2021). As a result, psychological support, such as providing information to patients and caregivers, assessing dependency and providing assistance in daily activities, being present and communicating with them, and reminding patients to take their medications, is provided (Nemani & Gurin, 2021). In terms of cultural influence on stroke, some communities still believe in spiritual explanations for the condition; however, this belief is fading as a result of the increased awareness created by social media (Sanuade, 2018). As a result, many communities now believe that early detection and treatment of diseases is the way to go. Furthermore, because stroke is perceived as more disabling than other conditions, communities move quickly to help stroke patients access the nearest available health center.

Goals Established to address Stroke

Specific objectives guide stroke management and prevention. The first goal in dealing with stroke is to prevent its occurrence. This goal is attained through a variety of strategies, some of which have already been discussed. A patient with high stroke risk factors, such as a hypertensive individual, will benefit greatly from taking antihypertensive medications, lowering the risk of stroke occurrence. Patients who have no obvious risk factors but, say, a positive family history of cardiovascular disease, should be screened for the risk diseases, begin early treatment, avoid risk behaviors such as alcohol consumption, and be physically active as much as possible (Pandian et al., 2018). The second goal is to prevent stroke recurrence and disability associated with stroke. This is accomplished through the use of antiaggregants (Aspirin), antihypertensives, the cessation of risk behaviors, healthy eating, and physical activity (Pandian et al., 2018 NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan). Furthermore, physiotherapy is an important intervention in stroke management to prevent disability; speech therapy is also important to prevent speech difficulties. Moreover, frequent turning in bed, the use of supportive items such as pillows and foam pads, and keeping the skin dry and clean aid in the prevention of decubitus ulcer. Finally, the other goal of management is to address stroke comorbidities. Patients are given thromboprophylaxis to prevent deep venous thrombosis, as well as antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pneumonia and urinary tract infections, both of which are common in stroke patients.

Community Resources

There are several community resources available to help with stroke prevention. Warmline, for example, connects stroke survivors and their families with a person, usually a health professional, who can offer support or a listening ear. If there is a problem with medications, a recurrence problem, or any other psychosocial sequelae, the patient or family members can reach out using the contact information provided (Erlebach et al., 2021 NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan). Aside from that, community physiotherapy halls are available to assist stroke patients in their recovery and to reduce the incidences of stroke-related disabilities (Erlebach et al., 2021). The physiotherapy sessions are conducted by qualified physiotherapists, for example, twice a week or as needed based on the patients’ condition. Furthermore, community nursing homes for the elderly are plentiful, and they help elderly patients recover well while also living a safe and secure life.

Conclusion

To summarize, stroke is a cardiovascular disease with significant morbidity and mortality. There are numerous risk factors for stroke, both non-modifiable and modifiable, the two most important of which are hypertension and diabetes. Stroke incidences will be significantly reduced if risk diseases are identified and treated early. Lifestyle changes, which have recently been prominent in the etiology and risk for various cardiovascular conditions, add to the risk. As a result of this discovery, interventions that target lifestyle changes have been shown to be beneficial in stroke management. Even as pharmacology plays an important role in stroke treatment, community resources such as physiotherapy joints, elderly homes, and Stroke organizations help to speed up the recovery process.

NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan References

  • Erlebach, R., Bächli, E., Gerrits, E., & Hess, M. (2021). Stroke management in a Swiss community hospital – in close collaboration with a stroke centre. Swiss Medical Weekly, 151, w20490. https://doi.org/10.4414/smw.2021.20490
  • Nemani, K., & Gurin, L. (2021). Neuropsychiatric complications after stroke. Seminars in Neurology, 41(1), 85–100. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1722723
  • Pandian, J. D., Gall, S. L., Kate, M. P., Silva, G. S., Akinyemi, R. O., Ovbiagele, B. I., Lavados, P. M., Gandhi, D. B. C., & Thrift, A. G. (2018). Prevention of stroke: a global perspective. Lancet, 392(10154), 1269–1278. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(18)31269-8
  • Roth, G. A., Mensah, G. A., Johnson, C. O., Addolorato, G., Ammirati, E., Baddour, L. M., Barengo, N. C., Beaton, A. Z., Benjamin, E. J., Benziger, C. P., Bonny, A., Brauer, M., Brodmann, M., Cahill, T. J., Carapetis, J., Catapano, A. L., Chugh, S. S., Cooper, L. T., Coresh, J., … GBD-NHLBI-JACC Global Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases Writing Group. (2020). Global Burden of cardiovascular diseases and risk factors, 1990-2019: Update from the GBD 2019 Study. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 76(25), 2982–3021. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2020.11.010
  • Sanuade, O. (2018). Understanding the cultural meanings of stroke in the Ghanaian setting: A qualitative study exploring the perspectives of local community residents. Wellcome Open Research, 3, 87. https://doi.org/10.12688/wellcomeopenres.14674.2
  • Tarvonen-Schröder, S., Hurme, S., & Laimi, K. (2019). The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0) and the WHO Minimal Generic Set of domains of functioning and health versus conventional instruments in subacute stroke. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine: Official Journal of the UEMS European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine51(9), 675–682. https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2583

Assessment 1 Instructions: Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Develop a 3-4 page preliminary care coordination plan for a selected health care problem. Include physical, psychosocial, and cultural considerations for this health care problem. Identify and list available community resources for a safe and effective continuum of care.

Introduction

NOTE: You are required to complete this assessment before Assessment 4.

The first step in any effective project is planning. This assignment provides an opportunity for you to strengthen your understanding of how to plan and negotiate the coordination of care for a particular health care problem. NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Include physical, psychosocial, and cultural considerations for this health care problem. Identify and list available community resources for a safe and effective continuum of care.

As you begin to prepare this assessment, you are encouraged to complete the Care Coordination Planning activity. Completion of this will provide useful practice, particularly for those of you who do not have care coordination experience in community settings. The information gained from completing this activity will help you succeed with the assessment. Completing formatives is also a way to demonstrate engagement.

Preparation – NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Imagine that you are a staff nurse in a community care center. Your facility has always had a dedicated case management staff that coordinated the patient plan of care, but recently, there were budget cuts and the case management staff has been relocated to the inpatient setting. Care coordination is essential to the success of effectively managing patients in the community setting, so you have been asked by your nurse manager to take on the role of care coordination. You are a bit unsure of the process, but you know you will do a good job because, as a nurse, you are familiar with difficult tasks. As you take on this expanded role, you will need to plan effectively in addressing the specific health concerns of community residents. NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

To prepare for this assessment, you may wish to:

Review the assessment instructions and scoring guide to ensure that you understand the work you will be asked to complete.

Allow plenty of time to plan your chosen health care concern.

Note: Remember that you can submit all, or a portion of, your draft plan to Smarthinking Tutoring for feedback, before you submit the final version for this assessment. If you plan on using this free service, be mindful of the turnaround time of 24-48 hours for receiving feedback. NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan Instructions

Note: You are required to complete this assessment before Assessment 4.

Develop the Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Complete the following:

Identify a health concern as the focus of your care coordination plan. In your plan, please include physical, psychosocial, and cultural needs. Possible health concerns may include, but are not limited to:

Stroke.

Heart disease (high blood pressure, stroke, or heart failure). Home safety.

Pulmonary disease (COPD or fibrotic lung disease). Orthopedic concerns (hip replacement or knee replacement). Cognitive impairment (Alzheimer’s disease or dementia).

Pain management. Mental health.

Trauma.

Identify available community resources for a safe and effective continuum of care.

Document Format and Length

Your preliminary plan should be an APA scholarly paper, 3-4 pages in length.

Remember to use active voice, this means being direct and writing concisely; as opposed to passive voice, which means writing with a tendency to wordiness. NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

In your paper include possible community resources that can be used.

Be sure to review the scoring guide to make sure all criteria are addressed in your paper.

Study the subtle differences between basic, proficient, and distinguished.

Supporting Evidence for NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Cite at least two credible sources from peer-reviewed journals or professional industry publications that support your preliminary plan.

NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan Grading Requirements

The requirements, outlined below, correspond to the grading criteria in the Preliminary Care Coordination Plan Scoring Guide, so be sure to address each point. Read the performance-level descriptions for each criterion to see how your work will be assessed. NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Analyze your selected health concern and the associated best practices for health improvement.

Cite supporting evidence for best practices.

Consider underlying assumptions and points of uncertainty in your analysis.

Describe specific goals that should be established to address the health care problem. Identify available community resources for a safe and effective continuum of care.

Organize content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions; contains few errors in grammar/punctuation,

word choice, and spelling.

Apply APA formatting to in-text citations and references, exhibiting nearly flawless adherence to APA format.

Write with a specific purpose with your patient in mind.

Adhere to scholarly and disciplinary writing standards and current APA formatting requirements.

Additional Requirements

Before submitting your assessment, proofread your preliminary care coordination plan and community resources list to minimize errors that could distract readers and make it more difficult for them to focus on the substance of your plan. Be sure to submit both documents. NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

Portfolio Prompt: Save your presentation to your ePortfolio.

Competencies Measured in NURS-FPX4050 Assessment 1 Preliminary Care Coordination Plan

By successfully completing this assessment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the course competencies through the following assessment scoring guide criteria:

Competency 1: Adapt care based on patient-centered and person-focused factors.

Analyze a health concern and the associated best practices for health improvement.

Competency 2: Collaborate with patients and family to achieve desired outcomes.

Describe specific goals that should be established to address a selected health care problem.

Competency 3: Create a satisfying patient experience.

Identify available community resources for a safe and effective continuum of care.

Competency 6: Apply professional, scholarly communication strategies to lead patient-centered care.

Organize content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions; contains few errors in grammar/punctuation, word choice, and spelling.

Apply APA formatting to in-text citations and references, exhibiting nearly flawless adherence to APA format.

SCORING GUIDE

Use the scoring guide to understand how your assessment will be evaluated.

VIEW SCORING GUIDE