Child Health Patient Profile

Child Health Patient Profile

Health Assessment of 2-year-old Underweight Female With Underweight Parents

Nurses in clinical settings use the nursing process to care for patients through an assemblage of subjective and objective information, implementing the intervention, and evaluating them to promote healing and recovery. During the patient assessment, a nurse can use tools and skills to objectively build health history and obtain data that can be shared and used in care.

Child Health Patient Profile

This week’s scenario is of a pediatric female patient (2 years old) underweight. She lives with her grandparents. Her parents are also underweight. This paper aims to describe additional information that would be required to understand this patient’s health and strategies to involve the parents in the child’s health.

Additional Information

The patient’s main concern is her weight-related health. To understand her weight-related health, I would inquire about further information pertaining causes of malnutrition and the impact of her low weight. I will first assess her nutritional information. This will include her source of food, who feed her, and how she is fed to understand the adequacy of meals.

Unstable sources would suggest that inadequate nutrition could be responsible for her being underweight (Reber et al., 2019). Understanding how she is fed may suggest a clue to the availability of her nutrition. The frequent absence of the child’s caretaker would suggest a limitation in her nutritional supply.

I will inquire about the size of her servings and common food groups she is fed to understand the adequacy of supply and balance nutrients supply. The presence of other food supplements will be crucial in this section of history taking. Information about the type of feeding, such as bottle-feeding, breastfeeding, and weaning history, will also be essential (Reber et al., 2019).

My nutritional history taking will be incomplete without the information on food allergies, food intolerance, and food avoidance. This is because the child could be allergic or intolerant to the primary source of food in the family.

Family history will also be important in understanding the child’s weight-related health. The family health history will include familial illness and non-inheritable chronic diseases (Tessier et al., 2019). I understands that the child’s parents are also underweight, thus the need to exclude inheritable illnesses that could lead to deterioration in weight. According to Kwong et al. (2020), family health history is a challenging aspect of building health history, especially in pediatric nursing.

Understanding parental ages, their source of income, their current health, and other underweight family members, such as sibling and their number, will be included in the family history (Foley et al., 2020; Kumar et al., 2019). Parental characteristics are not only crucial in the diagnosis of this child but also in tailoring management.

The child’s birth history that would be relevant in understanding his weight will include but is not limited to birthweight, gestational age at birth, maternal prenatal health complications, birth complications, and procedures at birth. The child’s relevant postnatal information will include any chronic illness, achievement of developmental milestones, and history of medication use in the two years after birth (Reber et al., 2019). These information pieces will help me understand the causes of her being underweight and complications attributable to her weight.

Health Risks

This patient’s health condition is associated with various health risks such as malnutrition, developmental delay, anemia, vitamin deficiencies, and weak immunity. Brain development is rapid before age 3. Therefore, nutritional deficiency leading to being underweight or malnutrition can cause a delay in the development of the brain and other organ systems.

These children are also at risk of infections due to weaker immunity. They can suffer severe consequences of illnesses such as flu, a common cold, and pneumonia. Metabolic complications such as rickets can develop in the setting of vitamin D deficiency (Kumar et al., 2019).

Malnutrition in this patient can also lead to kwashiorkor or marasmus and might have systemic complications. Further information that I would gather from the parents includes the presence of any chronic illness that the child has been suffering from since birth. I will also gather information about the growth trends of the child since birth to understand when the deterioration started and investigate any possible risks that could have resulted from this low underweight.

Recurrent illnesses such as infections would suggest low immunity thus, a positive history would be an alarm sign of weaker immunity (Reber et al., 2019). Undernutrition leading to deficiencies of nutrients, deprives the body of its ability to make immunity substances.

Specific Questions to Ask

  • What was the child’s birth weight?
  • Has the child’s food intake reduced in the past 6 months due to appetite problems?
  • Did the patient lose weight abruptly or over time?
  • In the last 24 hours, what has the child taken?
  • Did the patient suffer any acute or prolonged illness since birth? If any, which ones?

Strategies to Improve Parents’ involvement in Child’s Health

Involving the parents in this child’s health, wellness, and health promotive activities has benefits to her physical and emotional health. The child lives with her grandparents, which might risk her missing immediate parental bonding and affection.

The first strategy to increase parental involvement in her health is parental education (Sim et al., 2021). Parental education will enable the parents to understand the benefit of their involvement and the dangers of child neglect through the health belief model.

Parental education, in this case, will include explaining to them alarm signs of malnutrition and food plans that are affordable, accessible, sustainable, feasible, and safe. Therefore, involving the parent in the child’s health through food planning will ensure that the child’s nutritional status improves.

Another strategy is care coordination which will connect the parent with community resources to improve the child’s health. This coordination must ensure that the parents take the leading role in utilizing these resources to benefit their daughter. Community resources are essential in rehabilitative care for the patient and health restoration. The third strategy is communication with the parents.

Effective communication with the parents will improve parental engagement by creating a connection between the health provider, the parent, and the child’s health. Through communication, collaborative health planning with the parents can be achieved.

Conclusion

The child, in this case, has weight-related issues that can be traced back to nutritional, family, and socioeconomic issues. To access more relevant information on the issues and to understand the weight-related health of the patient, health history questions would focus on nutritional, birth, family, and social history. The question would help the clinician understand the potential causes and complications of undernutrition as well as plan for the management.

To involve the parents in this child’s health, parental education, parental communication, and care coordination are three strategies that might yield a positive outcome. Utilizing community resources and planning the child’s nutrition would best be achieved if the nurse and the parents can work collaboratively.

References

  • Foley, D. J., Hannon, J. K., O’Gorman, C. S., & Murphy, A. M. (2020). Evaluating documentation of social history in pediatric medical notes at a regional pediatric center – a quality improvement initiative. BMC Pediatrics20(1), 505. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-020-02395-0
  • Kumar, R., Abbas, F., Mahmood, T., & Somrongthong, R. (2019). Prevalence and factors associated with underweight children: a population-based subnational analysis from Pakistan. BMJ Open9(7), e028972. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-028972
  • Kwong, L., Bodurtha, J., & Busch, D. W. (2020). An integrative review of family health history in pediatrics. Clinical Pediatrics59(14), 1282–1287. https://doi.org/10.1177/0009922820943474
  • Reber, E., Gomes, F., Vasiloglou, M. F., Schuetz, P., & Stanga, Z. (2019). Nutritional risk screening and assessment. Journal of Clinical Medicine8(7), 1065. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8071065
  • Sim, W. H., Toumbourou, J. W., Clancy, E. M., Westrupp, E. M., Benstead, M. L., & Yap, M. B. H. (2021). Strategies to increase uptake of parent education programs in preschool and school settings to improve child outcomes: A Delphi study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health18(7), 3524. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073524
  • Tessier, L., Brehaut, J. C., Potter, B. K., Chakraborty, P., Carroll, J. C., Wilson, B. J., & on behalf of the CIHR Emerging Team in Genomics in Screening. (2019). Family history taking in pediatric practice: A qualitative interview study. Public Health Genomics22(3–4), 110–118. https://doi.org/10.1159/000503729

Child Health Patient Profile Assignment Instructions

During Week 2 you analyzed diversity considerations in health assessments and applied concepts, theories, and principles related to examination techniques, functional assessments, and cultural and diversity awareness in health assessment.

This week, you will explore various assessment tools and diagnostic tests that are used to gather information about patients’ conditions. You will examine the validity and reliability of these tests and tools. You will also examine assessment techniques, health risks and concerns, and recommendations for care related to patient growth, weight, and nutrition.

Learning Objectives

 

Students will:

  • Evaluate validity and reliability of assessment tools and diagnostic tests
  • Analyze diversity considerations in health assessments
  • Apply concepts, theories, and principles related to examination techniques, functional assessments, and cultural and diversity awareness in health assessment
  • Apply assessment skills to collect patient health histories

For this Assignment, you will consider the validity and reliability of different assessment tools and diagnostic tests. You will explore issues such as sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. You will also consider examples of children with various weight issues. You will explore how you could effectively gather information and encourage parents and caregivers to be proactive about their children’s health and weight.

 

To Prepare

  • Review this week’s Learning Resources and consider factors that impact the validity and reliability of various assessment tools and diagnostic tests. You also will review examples of pediatric patients and their families as it relates to BMI.
  • By Day 1 of this week, you will be assigned to one of the following Assignment options by your Instructor: Adult Assessment Tools or Diagnostic Tests (option 1), or Child Health Case (Option 2).
  •  Based on the Assignment option assigned to you, your Instructor will also assign you assessment tools or diagnostic tests to apply to either an adult or the child health example assigned to you. Note: Please see the “Course Announcements” section of the classroom for your assignments from your Instructor.
  • Search the Walden Library and credible sources for resources explaining the tool or test you were assigned. What is its purpose, how is it conducted, and what information does it gather?
  • Also, as you search the Walden library and credible sources, consider what the literature discusses regarding the validity, reliability, sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, ethical dilemmas, and controversies related to the test or tool.
  • If you are assigned Assignment Option 2 (Child), consider what health issues and risks may be relevant to the child in the health example.
    • Based on the risks you identified, consider what further information you would need to gain a full understanding of the child’s health. Think about how you could gather this information in a sensitive fashion.
    • Consider how you could encourage parents or caregivers to be proactive toward the child’s health.

The Assignment

Assignment (3–4 pages, not including title and reference pages):

 

Assignment Option 2: Child Health Issue

Assigned based on letter of last name

Case #2:

  • 2 year old underweight female with underweight parents who are live with elderly grandparents

Last name ( N-T)

Include the following:

This is for Option 2

An explanation of the health issues and risks that are relevant to the child you were assigned.

  • Describe additional information you would need in order to further assess his or her weight-related health.
  • Identify and describe any risks and consider what further information you would need to gain a full understanding of the child’s health. Think about how you could gather this information in a sensitive fashion.
  • Taking into account the parents’ and caregivers’ potential sensitivities, list at least three specific questions you would ask about the child to gather more information.
  • Provide at least two strategies you could employ to encourage the parents or caregivers to be proactive about their child’s health and weight.

NURS_6512_Week_3_Assignment_1_Rubric_Option_2

  Excellent Good Fair Poor
In 3–4 pages, address the following:

An explanation of the health issues and risks that are relevant to the child you were assigned.

20 (20%) – 25 (25%)The response clearly, accurately, and in detail explains the relevant health issues and risks for the assigned child. 19 (19%) – 24 (24%)The response accurately explains the relevant health issues and risks for the assigned child. 18 (18%) – 23 (23%)The response vaguely and with some inaccuracy explains the relevant health issues and risks for the assigned child. 0 (0%) – 17 (17%)The response is inaccurate and/or missing explanations of the relevant health issues and risks for the assigned child.
Describe additional information you would need in order to further assess his or her weight-related health. 20 (20%) – 25 (25%)The response clearly and accurately describes detailed additional information needed to further assess the child’s weight-related health. 19 (19%) – 24 (24%)The response accurately describes additional information needed to further assess the child’s weight-related health. 18 (18%) – 23 (23%)The response vaguely and with some inaccuracy describes additional information needed to further assess the child’s weight-related health. 0 (0%) – 17 (17%)The response is inaccurate and/or missing a description of additional information needed to further assess the child’s weight-related health.
Identify and describe any risks, and consider what further information you would need to gain a full understanding of the child’s health. Think about how you could gather this information in a sensitive fashion. 18 (18%) – 20 (20%)The response clearly and accurately identifies and describes in detail any risks to the child’s health. The response clearly and accurately identifies and describes in detail further information needed to gain a full understanding of the child’s health, with a detailed explanation of how to gather that information in a way that is sensitive to the child. 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)The response accurately identifies and describes any risks to the child’s health. The response accurately identifies and describes further information needed to gain a full understanding of the child’s health, with a clear explanation of how to gather that information in a way that is sensitive to the child. 14 (14%) – 14 (14%)The response vaguely and with some inaccuracy identifies and describes any risks to the child’s health. The response vaguely identifies and describes further information needed to gain a full understanding of the child’s health, with a vague explanation of how to gather that information in a way that is sensitive to the child. 0 (0%) – 13 (13%)The response identifies inaccurately and/or is missing descriptions of any risks to the child’s health. The response identifies inaccurately and/or is missing descriptions of further information needed to gain a full understanding of the child’s health, with an inadequate or missing explanation of how to gather that information in a way that is sensitive to the child.
Taking into account the parents’ and caregivers’ potential sensitivities, list at least three specific questions you would ask about the child to gather more information. 10 (10%) – 10 (10%)The response clearly and accurately lists three or more specific questions that would gather more information about the child. Specific questions are carefully worded to clearly demonstrate sensitivity to the parent(s) or caregiver(s) of the child. 9 (9%) – 9 (9%)The response lists three specific questions that would gather more information about the child. Specific questions are worded to demonstrate sensitivity to the parent(s) or caregiver(s) of the child. 8 (8%) – 8 (8%)The response lists three questions with wording that is vague and lacking specificity for gathering more information about the child. Some wording of the questions lacks sensitivity to the parent(s) or caregiver(s) of the child. 0 (0%) – 7 (7%)The response lists two or fewer confusing or inadequate questions, or is missing questions, for gathering more information about the child. Wording of questions provided lacks sensitivity to the parent(s) or caregiver(s) of the child.
Provide at least two strategies you could employ to encourage the parents or caregivers to be proactive about their child’s health and weight. 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)The response clearly describes two or more detailed strategies to encourage the parent(s) or caregiver(s) to be proactive about the child’s health and weight. 4 (4%) – 4 (4%)The response describes at least two strategies to encourage the parent(s) or caregiver(s) to be proactive about the child’s health and weight. 3 (3%) – 3 (3%)The response vaguely describes two strategies to encourage the parent(s) or caregiver(s) to be proactive about the child’s health and weight. 0 (0%) – 2 (2%)The response inadequately describes one strategy or is missing strategies to encourage the parent(s) or caregiver(s) to be proactive about the child’s health and weight.
Written Expression and Formatting – Paragraph Development and Organization:
Paragraphs make clear points that support well-developed ideas, flow logically, and demonstrate continuity of ideas. Sentences are carefully focused–neither long and rambling nor short and lacking substance. A clear and comprehensive purpose statement and introduction are provided that delineate all required criteria.
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity. A clear and comprehensive purpose statement, introduction, and conclusion are provided that delineate all required criteria. 4 (4%) – 4 (4%)Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time. Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment are stated, yet are brief and not descriptive. 3 (3%) – 3 (3%)Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 60%–79% of the time. Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment are vague or off topic. 0 (0%) – 2 (2%)Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity < 60% of the time. No purpose statement, introduction, or conclusion were provided.
Written Expression and Formatting – English writing standards:
Correct grammar, mechanics, and proper punctuation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)Uses correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation with no errors. 4 (4%) – 4 (4%)Contains a few (1 or 2) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. 3 (3%) – 3 (3%)Contains several (3 or 4) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. 0 (0%) – 2 (2%)Contains many (≥ 5) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that interfere with the reader’s understanding.
Written Expression and Formatting – The paper follows correct APA format for title page, headings, font, spacing, margins, indentations, page numbers, running heads, parenthetical/in-text citations, and reference list. 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)Uses correct APA format with no errors. 4 (4%) – 4 (4%)Contains a few (1 or 2) APA format errors. 3 (3%) – 3 (3%)Contains several (3 or 4) APA format errors. 0 (0%) – 2 (2%)Contains many (≥ 5) APA format errors.
Total Points: 100

Name: NURS_6512_Week_3_Assignment_1_Rubric_Option_2