Quantitative Article 2 Evidence Synthesis

Quantitative research is a type of research that uses data in numerical form, meaning that data collection, analysis, and reporting are done in numerical form. According to Shkoler (2018), quantitative research is used to formulate facts, uncover patterns in research or generalize results from large samples. Some of the data collection methods used in quantitative research include surveys and structured interviews. This discussion presents one quantitative article related to diabetes. The evidence and findings from the article and the two previous articles will also be analyzed.

Quantitative Article 2 Evidence Synthesis

The quantitative article selected is Diabetes and the Risk of Hospitalization for Infection: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study by Fang et al. (2021).

The APA reference and permalink are

Fang, M., Ishigami, J., Echouffo-Tcheugui, J. B., Lutsey, P. L., Pankow, J. S., & Selvin, E. (2021). Diabetes and the risk of hospitalization for infection: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Diabetologia64(11), 2458-2465. https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000710

The research presented in this article aims at identifying and assessing the relationship between diabetes and the risk of hospitalization following diabetes-related infection. The study was conducted on the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) group. Diabetes was found to lead to a high risk of hospitalization for infections.

The previously selected two articles were “Challenges to Diabetes Self-Management for Adults with Type 2 diabetes in Low-Resource Settings in Mexico City: A Qualitative Descriptive Study” by Whittemore et al. (2019) and “Factors influencing Healthcare Providers’ attitude and willingness to use information technology in diabetes management” by Seboka, Yilma & Birhanu (2021).

The central theme consistent in the three selected studies is improving the quality of life for diabetes patients. The first, second, and third study themes are information technology and diabetes, challenges in diabetes self-management and diabetes, and the risk of hospitalization, respectively. The three themes aim at improving the quality of life for diabetes patients.

The collective findings include that the challenges encountered by diabetes patients in diabetes self-management contribute to poor health outcomes and affect their quality of life. These challenges include a lack of social support from the family and society, inadequate resources, difficulties in lifestyle modification, and the availability of diabetes-related mental health issues.

Additionally, healthcare providers are willing and ready to enhance diabetes self-management and address these challenges using health information technology. People with diabetes are at a higher risk of infections leading to hospitalization than those without diabetes. Appropriate diabetes management and self-management considerably improve the patient’s health outcomes and reduces the risk of infections that may lead to hospitalization.

All the studies are similar in that their focus is diabetes, and their purpose is improving the quality of life for diabetes patients. However, they have some differences. For instance, the first and the third article focus on the patient alone as the study subjects. In contrast, the second article seeks to identify the challenges of diabetes self-management based on type 2 diabetes patients and care providers.

The objective overarching finding for the three articles is that the appropriate diabetes management, and more so diabetes self-management, facilitated by healthcare technology can reduce diabetes-related infections, complications, and hospitalization, thus leading to better health outcomes for diabetes patients and therefore improving the quality of life.

In conclusion, the three individual studies have a similar purpose: to improve health outcomes and the quality of life for diabetes patients. Thus, the three studies contribute to addressing the national health practice problem, diabetes.

Quantitative Article 2 Evidence Synthesis References

Fang, M., Ishigami, J., Echouffo-Tcheugui, J. B., Lutsey, P. L., Pankow, J. S., & Selvin, E. (2021). Diabetes and the risk of hospitalization for infection: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Diabetologia64(11), 2458-2465. https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000710

Seboka, B. T., Yilma, T. M., & Birhanu, A. Y. (2021). Factors influencing healthcare providers’ attitude and willingness to use information technology in diabetes management. BMC Medical Informatics And Decision Making21(1), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12911-021-01398-w

Shkoler, O. (2018). Using contemporary quantitative techniques. In Quantitative Research Methods in Consumer Psychology (pp. 22-58). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315641577-2/

Whittemore, R., Vilar-Compte, M., De La Cerda, S., Marron, D., Conover, R., Delvy, R., Lozano, A. M. & Pérez-Escamilla, R. (2019). Challenges to diabetes self-management for adults with type 2 diabetes in low-resource settings in Mexico City: a qualitative descriptive study. International Journal For Equity In Health18(1), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-019-1035-x