NHS-FPX6004 Assessment 4 Training Session for Policy Implementation

Training Session for Policy Implementation

Quality improvement initiatives are essential for any healthcare institution. Moreover, the implementors are integral persons and must have complete knowledge and understanding of the project to guarantee its success. After reviewing Mercy Medical Center’s public diabetes dashboard, the HbA1c tests were the most underperforming metrics, and the intervention of choice is extensive patient education in two sessions per quartet.

NHS-FPX6004 Assessment 4 Training Session for Policy Implementation

Patient education is best done by professionals within the organization who understand the patients’ problems accurately and can connect with them to boost their clinic attendance. Healthcare professionals are the implementors of interest in this project. Their training is integral for high-quality patient education. This essay focuses on the staff training session to prepare for implementing the diabetes education program.

Evidence-based strategies for Promoting Nurses’ Buy-in

Resistance to change is the biggest downfall because interventions rely on professionals’ efforts that are lacking during resistance. The lack of professionals’ input will impair decision-making processes and professional collaboration, thus, poor project outcomes. The first step is to prepare and present data supporting the claim. Kurt Lewin’s change theory postulates that the first step in managing change is providing data on the current shortfalls and clearly showing the need for change (Hussain et al., 2018).

Presenting data is vital because it helps individuals understand the extent of the problem and the benefits of the change and helps professionals put effort into implementing it. The second strategy is aligning the objectives to the organizational strategic mission and vision. Workers in an organization are kept together by a set of statutes that guide their actions. Ensuring the objectives align with the organization’s strategic mission and vision will gain buy-in for the project (Hussain et al., 2018).

People readily accept something that improves their workplace conditions and aligns with their values. Hughes et al. (2018) show that Involving individuals in decision-making increases their participation and promotes the success of interventions. Involving staff in decision-making will thus be integral in improving the acceptability of interventions. Leaving some decisions to the professionals, such as who will be the educators or content creators, will help the professionals feel part of the team and thus collaborate.

Early Indicators of Success

Early indicators of success will entail structure, process, and outcome indicators. Structure indicators will include the purchase/preparation of supporting structures such as building preparation, content for education, projectors, and fliers for education. Process indicators will include the first advanced reports and briefs and the implementation of the initial education sessions. Implementation of the initial sessions will indicate progress towards achieving the overall goal.

Early outcomes success indicators will include patient self-reports of change in health behavior. Their verbalization will show commitment to improving their health behavior. Another indicator is a rise in the number of patients attending the clinic for the education sessions. It will help show that patients are gaining interest and knowledge of the education program, indicating that the education might succeed in achieving its objectives.

Impact of the Policy and Practice Guidelines

The new policy and practice guidelines sessions will take three duty days every quarter. The education will be held in the diabetes outpatient clinic for two hours, from 9:00 am to 11 am, after which the staff will see patients willing to take their routine follow-up in the department. All other roles and activities during the day in the diabetes clinic will be suspended until after the end of the education session.

The session will bring many patients to the clinic, and the number of expected patients will also be high. Thus, the clinic will require more staff to provide services to all these patients. These days will have significantly more work and increase the role group workload. Diabetes clinic booking will also be made concerning the education sessions. Gucciardi et al. (2020) note that patient education promotes better outcomes through early detection and prompt healthcare services consultation, hence better patient outcomes. The education will thus help improve healthcare performance.

Justification of the New Policy and Practice Guidelines

Educating the patients is integral for newly diagnosed patients and those with ongoing treatment. The session will emphasize the importance of routine follow-up and will thus ensure diabetic patients attend their follow-up clients promptly. The education sessions will also increase the number of patients attending the clinic (Ghisi et al., 2021). Attending diabetes follow-ups, especially HbA1c tests, will enable the healthcare providers to monitor the patients and improve their outcomes.

The follow-up will help healthcare providers detect and manage complications early, preventing high healthcare costs and complications associated with prolonged poor diabetes management (Kurup et al., 2019). The tests will also help them make healthcare decisions, such as the appropriate therapy and therapy changes when patients present with resistance to therapy. Gucciardi et al. (2020) also note that education improves patient management and follow-up collaboration, hence better outcomes. Thus, the new policy and practice guidelines will enhance the quality of care, promote patient safety, and reduce healthcare costs.

Role Group’s Importance in Implementing the Policy and Practice Guidelines

Healthcare providers will have many roles in implementing the proposed patient education program. They will prepare the content based on the outline created by the organizational leadership. Healthcare professionals will prepare materials and request additional relevant materials from the organization to promote the success of the policy and practice guidelines.

They will also decide among themselves the individuals to teach the patients, and the institution’s leadership will approve the plan. Preparing the content and individuals responsible for teaching patients will improve their sense of importance and involvement and will thus boost their collaboration. Monetary reimbursement for the staff involved will help motivate them and empower them to increase their efforts in implementing the patient education program.

They will also inform patients to create awareness of the education program. Nurses are left with the duty of tracking patients, but all healthcare providers will help inform patients attending the clinic and emphasize the importance of attending the sessions. Informing the patients will help boost organizational efforts to inform patients through social, electronic, and print media advertisements (Ghisi et al., 2021). They will implement the education programs.

The nurses and other healthcare providers in the institution form the bulk of the facilitators, and after preparing the programs, they will implement them by educating the patients on the importance of HbA1c tests and the overall follow-up in diabetic patients (Kurup et al., 2019). They will collect data to enhance the monitoring and reporting processes of the program. Healthcare leaders will monitor the program continuously, determine areas that require improvement, and implement the interventions.

Healthcare providers will collect these data through surveys and routine data entry to enhance these activities’ success. These roles are vital to the program and cannot be successful without healthcare providers. The activities would be costly if carried out by external facilitators; hence, gathering their support (buy-in) and effort in its implementation is essential for their success.

Appropriate and Effective Instructional Content, Learning Activities, and Learning Materials

The learning material will entail a PowerPoint presentation, fliers, and directions to the organizational website for more information on the topic discussed. Sessions will begin with a discussion to activate staff knowledge on diabetes and its management, and instructional materials will contain diabetes statistics, pathophysiology, causes, management, complications, and follow-up.

Porada et al. (2019) show that staff education should focus on the objectives of patient education and should ensure that staff is ready to teach patients as per the set objectives. The content will also inform nurses of the extent and focus of the education. It will improve their presentation skills and help them create content that meets the program’s objectives. The instructional materials will enhance education delivery during the education session and after the nurses go home (Porada et al., 2019). They will facilitate earning and later reference for proper healthcare decision-making.

The learning activities will also entail five-minute group work to activate schema and promote learning among the patients. A question-answer session in the last 15 minutes will increase interactions, array fears, promote clarity, and bridge staff’s knowledge gaps. The education will occur within the allocated two hours if these activities are carried out within the allocated time. The education will be comprehensive but will take less time because healthcare providers have extensive knowledge of diabetes.

Conclusion

Staff education is integral for proper preparation and flawless delivery of patient education. The new policy and practice guidelines will entail patient education sessions, and educating staff will increase their buy-in and collaboration, enhancing the programs’ success. The program will increase patients’ knowledge and promote better health outcomes.

The education sessions will highly depend on healthcare providers- nurses. Thus, their education is paramount and should be extensive. The PowerPoint presentation, fliers, and website content will be integral instructional materials for the education session. Educating nurses will increase their buy-in, promote their knowledge, and thus promote achieving the program’s objectives.

References

  • Ghisi, G. L. D. M., Seixas, M. B., Pereira, D. S., Cisneros, L. L., Ezequiel, D. G. A., Aultman, C., Sandison, N., Oh, P., & da Silva, L. P. (2021). Patient education program for Brazilians living with diabetes and prediabetes: findings from a development study. BMC Public Health, 21(1), 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-11300-y
  • Gucciardi, E., Xu, C., Vitale, M., Lou, W., Horodezny, S., Dorado, L., Sidani, S., & Shah, B. R. (2020). Evaluating the impact of onsite diabetes education teams in primary care on clinical outcomes. BMC Family Practice, 21(1), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12875-020-01111-2
  • Hughes, T. M., Merath, K., Chen, Q., Sun, S., Palmer, E., Idrees, J. J., Okunrintemi, V., Squires, M., Beal, E. W., & Pawlik, T. M. (2018). Association of shared decision-making on patient-reported health outcomes and healthcare utilization. The American Journal of Surgery, 216(1), 7–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2018.01.011
  • Hussain, S. T., Lei, S., Akram, T., Haider, M. J., Hussain, S. H., & Ali, M. (2018). Kurt Lewin’s change model: A critical review of the role of leadership and employee involvement in organizational change. Journal of Innovation & Knowledge, 3(3), 123-127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jik.2016.07.002
  • Kurup, R., Deoraj, M., & Persaud, S. (2019). Significance of HbA1c in Monitoring Diabetes at the Public Hospital, Guyana. Southeastern European Medical Journal: SEEMEDJ, 3(1), 60-68. https://doi.org/10.26332/seemedj.v3i1.87
  • Porada, H., Godin, C., Laliberte, M., & Linton, P. (2019). 47-Train the Trainer: Empowering Health-Care Workers to Enhance Diabetes Patient Care. Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 43(7), S20-S21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcjd.2019.07.056

Training Session for Policy Implementation Scoring Guide

CRITERIA NON-PERFORMANCE BASIC PROFICIENT DISTINGUISHED
Summarize evidence-based strategies for working with a selected role group to promote their buy-in and prepare them to implement a new policy and apply associated practice guidelines to their work. Does not suggest approaches for working with a specific group to ensure buy-in and preparedness to implement a policy and apply practice guidelines. Suggests poorly-developed approaches for working with a specific group, which will not clearly ensure buy-in and preparedness, or strategies are not supported by evidence. Summarizes evidence-based strategies for working with a selected role group to promote their buy-in and prepare them to implement a new policy and apply associated practice guidelines to their work. Succinctly summarizes evidence-based strategies for working with a selected role group to promote their buy-in and prepare them to implement a new policy and apply associated practice guidelines to their work. Argues effectively for the efficacy of these strategies and suggests insightful measures indicative of early success.
Explain the impact of a new policy and practice guidelines. Does not describe a new policy and practice guidelines. Describes a new policy and practice guidelines. Explains the impact of a new policy and practice guidelines. Explains the impact of a new policy and practice guidelines. Offers clear insight into their implementation and effects on the role group’s daily work routines and responsibilities. Interprets complex policy considerations or practice guidelines with respect and clarity.
Justify the importance of a new policy and practice guidelines with regard to improving the quality of care or outcomes related to a selected role group’s work. Does not justify the importance of a new policy and practice guidelines with regard to improving the quality of care or outcomes related to a selected role group’s work. Presents unconvincing justification for the importance of a new policy and practice guidelines with regard to improving the quality of care or outcomes related to a selected role group’s work. Justifies the importance of a new policy and practice guidelines with regard to improving the quality of care or outcomes related to a selected role group’s work. Justifies the importance of a new policy and practice guidelines with regard to improving the quality of care or outcomes related to a selected role group’s work. Presents a compelling and persuasive argument that will appeal to the group.
Explain a selected role group’s importance in implementing a new policy and practice guidelines. Does not describe the selected group’s role in implementing a new policy and practice guidelines. Describes the selected group’s role in implementing a new policy and practice guidelines. Explains a selected role group’s importance in implementing a new policy and practice guidelines. Provides a clear, concise, explanation of a selected role group’s importance in implementing a new policy and practice guidelines. Suggests an empowering, future vision highlighting the positive contributions of the group.
Determine appropriate and effective instructional content, learning activities, and materials for a training session. Does not describe instructional content, learning activities, and materials for a training session. Describes instructional content, activities, and materials for a training session. Determines appropriate and effective instructional content, learning activities, and materials for a training session. Determines appropriate and effective instructional content, learning activities, and materials for a training session. Provides convincing justification for the effectiveness of each proposed activity in supporting learning and skill development, exhibiting insight into the group’s work and the particular demands of implementing a new policy and practice guidelines.
Organize content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions. Does not organize content for ideas to flow logically with smooth transitions. Organizes content with some logical flow and smooth transitions. Organizes content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions. Organizes content so clarity is enhanced and all ideas flow logically with smooth transitions.
Support main points, assertions, arguments, conclusions, or recommendations with relevant and credible evidence. Does not support main points, assertions, arguments, conclusions, or recommendations with relevant and credible evidence. Sources lack relevance or credibility, or the evidence is not persuasive or explicitly supportive of main points, assertions, arguments, conclusions, or recommendations. Supports main points, assertions, arguments, conclusions, or recommendations with relevant and credible evidence. Supports main points, assertions, arguments, conclusions, or recommendations with relevant, credible, and convincing evidence. Skillfully combines virtually error-free source citations with a perceptive and coherent synthesis of the evidence.

NHS-FPX6004 Assessment 4 Training Session for Policy Implementation Instructions